Wheatland Tube Color

A Brief Review of Test, Burst and Working Pressures

Wheatland’s Schedule 40 black and galvanized pipe, made to conform to the ASTM A53 specification, is intended for mechanical and pressure applications. The Scope of ASTM A53 states, "Pipe ordered under this specification is intended for mechanical and pressure applications and is also acceptable for ordinary uses in steam, water, gas and air lines". Pipe for use under pressure is also important for sprinkler piping, API Line pipe, tubing and casing and the coupling stock we make.

To help you differentiate between the types of testing, working and burst pressures, below is a brief review.

Test Pressure

Test pressure refers to the hydrostatic (water) pressure test applied at the mill. It is an inspection device used to assure integrity of the pipe body and weld.

A general rule applied in selecting test pressures is that test pressure must exceed service pressure to which the pipe would ordinarily be subjected. Test pressures do, however, increase as the wall thickness of the pipe increases

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CPVC Sprinkler Pipe: 31 Flavors of Risk

I’m sure there are some applications where installing CPVC sprinkler pipe makes sense.

Like, for instance, when the installer contractors won’t be eating lunch that day.

And when you’re certain no one will ever be painting, soldering or wiring anywhere near it. Or caulking. Or spraying for pests. Or using any number of oils, greases, solvents or foams in the CPVC’s vicinity — for years after you finish the job.

I’m sure applications like that exist…. I just can’t think of any.

In all seriousness (because this is a very serious topic), there’s a good chance that you may not be fully aware of just how many materials are incompatible with CPVC sprinkler pipe. Common products that contractors could possibly encounter— like caulk residue or oil on French Fries — could potentially come in contact with the CPVC and may cause the system to drip, crack or fail completely. Then you find yourself potentially at risk for potential property damage or even loss of life — and if, something like that happens, you and your company may be held liable.

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Do you Design or Install Fire Protection Systems? You May Face New Risks

Steel pipe in sprinkler systems has been used for over 100 years without the kinds of cautions and warnings that CPVC pipe carries. Today, some CPVC have abdicated compatibility testing, leaving it to third party testing agencies.

Any contractor or engineer who designs or installs fire protection systems must understand the implications of the most recent changes to manufacturer certification criteria.

Effective January 1, 2013, some CPVC manufacturers are no longer listing steel pipe in their compatibility certification programs. Previously, CPVC manufacturers were responsible for testing and certifying the compatibility of their product for use in fire protection systems.

Why risk fire safety…or the reputation of your business…or your customer’s peace of mind…when you can be 100 percent compliant with 100 percent steel?

Let’s face it: the perfect job for a contractor is to get on, get out and be comfortable knowing that the job is protected by steel with a proven track record of compatibility with all of the typical ancillary products used in a system. This allows the contractor a competitive edge in not being tied to specific products that have to be specially tested as compatible with plastic pipe as you do with CPVC.

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